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Digital Week in Review: Twitter Acquires Sharing And Discovery Platform Bagcheck

Emily Kostic August 8, 2011 Category Agency News

Google, Oracle Still Battling Over Android E-mail; PC World
Google and Oracle continue to tussle over a potentially damaging e-mail in the ongoing lawsuit over alleged Java patent violations in the Android mobile OS.
The Takeaway:  Oracle sued Google in August 2010, alleging that Android violated a number of patents held by Oracle on the Java programming language, which it acquired through the purchase of Sun Microsystems. Google has denied any wrongdoing. A trial has been scheduled for Oct. 31, but Alsup has indicated he’d like the companies to settle the matter before then. Only time will tell how this legal matter is settled. Like most cases like this, the complexities could favor either party.

Twitter Acquires Sharing And Discovery Platform Bagcheck; The Washington Post
Twitter has acquired Bagcheck, a sharing and discovery platform. Terms of the acquisition were not disclosed, and founder Sam Pullara will be joining the Twitter engineering team.
The Takeaway: So what is Bagcheck and why does this acquisition matter? Bagcheck allows people to share and discover what’s inside your “bags”. It allows people to talk about and share lists of the stuff they use and why. By ‘bags’, the startup refers to any sort of curated list or collection. For example, peop
le can post a collection of photography gear or what their favorite cooking tools are. What does this mean for Twitter users? It means that finding people who have similar interests as you will now be a whole lot easier.

ISPs Are Hijacking Bing & Yahoo Searches; Search Engine Watch
Several Internet service providers (ISPs) are intentionally hijacking search queries to gain affiliate dollars, according to Reese Richman LLP, a New York Law Firm. Reese Richman filed a lawsuit Aug. 4 against one of the ISPs and the group behind the hijacking technology.
The Takeaway:  Bing and Yahoo have yet to take any legal measures, however, and their searches are still being redirected without warning for certain terms.

Google’s New Tablet Operating System Is A Bad Idea; BusinessInsider
Web developer Francois Beaufort has posted a video of Google’s Chrome OS customized for tablet computers, and well, it’s interesting to say the least.
The Takeaway: For 90% of Chrome OS to work, you’ll need an internet connection. How many people are willing to buy a more expensive tablet with an antenna for data, as well as a pricey monthly plan? You’ll need a hefty hunk of data when you’re only using the tablet for internet use. If Google just developed a Chrome browser for tablets, you’d be able to do all the normal things you’d do offline (like games, write in a notepad, check emails, etc), while having all the benefits of Chrome.

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